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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  December 8, 2010 2:35am-4:00am EST

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then people will question the wisdom of that strategy. in this case, the hostage was the american people. and i was not willing to see them get harmed. >> reporter: on capitol hill, the so-called hostage-takers -- otherwise known as senate republicans -- expressed support for the compromise. >> the agreement is essentially final. >> reporter: and democrats? not so much. >> it's something that's not done yet, let's make that clear. so i'm not a big fan of what has been negotiated. >> reporter: there was a lot of that going around. senator tom harkin said the president should have said this -- >> i'm going to use my veto pen. to veto anything they would send me that would extend those tax breaks to the wealthiest americans. >> reporter: independent bernie sanders is vowing to filibuster the bill. >> i'm going to do everything that i can so oppose it because i think it as moral outrage. >> reporter: the president said the democrats' criticism reminded him of the health care debate, when progressives said because the bill did not meet
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certain expectations, it was a failure. >> if that's the standard by which we are measuring, success or pocore principles, face it, will never get anything done. people will have the satisfaction of having a purist position and no victories for the american people. and we will be able to feel good about ourselves and sanctimonious about how pure our intentions are and how tough we are. and in the meantime, the american people are still seeing themselves not able to get health insurance because of pre-existing conditions. >> reporter: and more directly, president obama's message for his democratic friends, let's make sure we understand this is a long game, not a short game. look what i promised during the campaign, there's not a single thing that i said i would do that i have not either done or tried to do, and if i haven't gotten it done yet, i'm still trying to do it." jake tapper, abc news, the white
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house. wikileaks is wasting no time posting a new batch of secret cables just hours after founder julian assange surrendered in london on sex crime charges. u.s. officials, of course, welcome the arrest saying the spilled secrets are damaging relations with foreign countries. assange fired back in an op ed piece out this morning vowing to continue "publishing facts that need to be made public." police in roanoke, virginia, are searching for a 12-year-old girl believed to be in grave danger. britney naismith was missing since her mother was found dead in her home. a candlelight vigil was held to remember the mother and pray for britney's safe return. police believe the seventh grader has been kidnapped by her mother's boyfriend. take a photo i.d. the next time you go to the u.p.s. store. the shipping giant is requiring identification for customers shipping packages at retail locations around the world. the change comes a month after explosives made their way onto one of the company's planes. the change applies at the u.p.s.
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store, mailboxes etc locations and other shipping outlets. >> important to remember that with all the holidays and all the shipping going on. we are barely into december and already much of the country has been hard hit with winter-like weather. diana alvear has details on the spate of snow storms and record lows. >> reporter: in the windy city, inter has set in bringing with it below-zero windchills. >> i'm just thinking that i want to be inside and i hope i don't blow into the river. >> reporter: it's not just chicago. from west virginia to north carolina to pennsylvania, snow and high winds are making getting anywhere a battle. even in blizzard-weary buffalo, residents struggled with 4 feet of snow in two days. >> i've shoveled four or give times yesterday and this is my first time today, i've probably got five or six hours in altogether. >> reporter: so what's to blame for this big chill?
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meteorologists say a weather formation is blocking cold air from canada from escaping to the atlantic ocean. so it's flowing down the east coast and into the south, plunging temperatures and plenty of snow. >> i'd like to go to florida. >> reporter: you won't feel much warmer. it was so chilly in palm beach, parrots and other zoo animals clustered around heat lamps. some cages were completely covered with plastic to block the wind. farmers worked around the clock, sprayi ining crops to keep themm freezing overnight. another hard freeze is forecast in the days to come. as temperatures drop, natural gas prices are on the rise. they hit a four-month high on tuesday and may climb even higher if this cold weather continues to hold. diana alvear, abc news, atlanta. here's a look at the rest of the forecast around the country. the snow finally winds down around the great lakes but not before adding up to 10 inches to several feet already on the ground there.
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on top of that, showers along the gulf coast. rain in seattle, portland, and san francisco. snow in the cascades and rockies. >> 40s from billings and salt lake city. a biting 10 degrees in fargo and 12 in minneapolis. 30s from boston to atlanta. 50s in new orleans and dallas. thousands of ikea employees have a new ride this morning. the swedish retail giant gave each of its 12,000 workers a brand-new mountain bike as a christmas gift. the company said the bikes reflected its strong commitment to health and the environment. workers who don't want the bikes are instead donating them to charity. >> i hope they gave them the added gift of assembling them. i love you, ikea, but i can't assemble anything you give me. nancy pelosi performed one of her final and most festive acts as speaker of the house. >> pelosi flipped the switch last night to light the 2010 capitol christmas tree. the spruce on the west lawn of the capitol hails from wyoming and is covered with 5,000
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ornaments made by the nation's school children. >> the tree will be lit from tusk to 11:00 p.m. every night until new year's day. >> pretty scene at the nation's capitol. more after this, we'll be right back. love legendary covergirl lashblast?
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lunesta helps you fall asleep and stay asleep, so you can wake up feeling rested. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions, such as tongue or throat swelling, occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a $0 co-pay at lunesta.com. sleep well, on the wings of lunesta.
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well, a new global report card about education is out and america is failing. >> especially america's teens. they are falling way behind students in many other countries. especially china. >> the chinese take education seriously as our colleagues at "world news" recently saw firsthand. david muir was along on that trip. he reports now on the new test scores. >> reporter: nearly 500,000
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15-year-olds from all over the world took the tests. the top five scores in math -- shanghai, china, singapore, hong kong, south korea, taiwan. and way down the list, 30th, the u.s. in science, again, shanghai, china at the top. then finland, hong kong, singapore, japan. 20th, the u.s. in reading, shanghai, china, again. and the others. and down at 17th, the u.s. in her travels to china, it was everywhere. at laser focus on education. this public school in shanghai where the children were 2 years old. by 3, they're at school from 8:00 to 4:00. already learning phrases in english. on average, chinese students attend 41 more days of school every year. with some attending classes on the weekends, it amounts to 30% more hours of instructions every year too. china, now much of asia, firmly sees a future beyond those factories. >> nobody wants to be the shoe manufacturer of the world. everybody wants to be in the
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scientific and technical sector. >> reporter: it's a global turning point the u.s. has faced before. 1960, then-candidate john f. kennedy, frustrated at the soviets at that moment, seemed to be winning the space race. >> the first vehicle in space was called sputnik. not vanguard. >> reporter: money was poured into math and science. less than a decade later, we put a man on the moon. with these test scores, now a new call from this president. >> 50 years later, our generation's sputnik moment is back. >> reporter: and it's not just asia. finland too. by the seventh grade, every finnish child will have learned three languages. they start physics and chemistry in middle school. and one other number we were stunned to learn came from stanford, a new study looking at this international test. it said if american students were able to raise their scores by just 4% or 5%, it would translate into another $41 trillion in the u.s. economy in just the next 20 years. david muir, abc news, new york. >> i think a lot of us are not
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surprised to hear american schools are falling behind. it's news we've heard again and again. >> only getting worse, apparently, that's the sad news. speaking of report cards we would love to hear how you would grade rob and i. go to our facebook fan page. >> be gentle, y'all are rough on there sometimes. >> we also have an added bonus. what does my cup say this morning? something pretty interesting, i'm not going to let you see it, you have to become a friend of the show. >> speaking of friends we are just under 24,000. we decided we're going to have a big party on the air when we hit 25,000. >> you'll get nothing but we will. >> we will eat pizza and food. no other promises other than that. friend us, get us there, we want food. >> stick around, we'll be right back. >> for information on services for older adults, the eldercare locator can help! >> it's great having a friendly person deliver a healthy meal- and having meals delivered makes it possible for me to stay in my own home. >> the eldercare locator can put you in touch with local resources to help older persons
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find home and community based services. call 1.800.677.1116 or visit eldercare.gov today! the eldercare locator is a free public service of the u.s. administration on aging. just last week doctors told elizabeth edwards she could have up to two months to live and friends say no one was as surprised as she that the end
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came so quickly. >> as reported earlier, edwards died yesterday morning after her long battle with breast cancer. to the very end, she was posting messages on facebook about the lessons she's learned. >> here, some of those lessons on life and death in her own words. >> for me it's not as scary. in part because i have to believe that there's a chance of reunion of some sort with wade. and so death offers me that, which life can't offer me. so death doesn't -- i don't fear it in the same way, except that i fear it for my family. i fear what happens to them. the children understand that the cancer has come back. we didn't try to prettify that in any way. this is the way it is. but we also said at the same time, everybody who's sitting at this table who's not going to die, raise your hand.
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and they realized that we're all going to die. but we're also extraordinarily honest with them. because there will come a day when they're going to have to accept that cancer has at some point taken me. >> to me the scariest thing is thinking about clair and jack. and i want them to have their mom. you know, this mom. the same way that i did. what scares me the most is that they'll be derived of her at some point sooner than they should be. >> i had to reconcile the god i thought i had with the facts i knew. if i was going to have a god, it couldn't be an intervening god anymore. i couldn't pray anymore for god to intervene. which means i can't pray for him to intervene in my cancer. instead, the god that i came to accept is a god that promises salvation and enlightenment and that's the god i live with now. it's not entirely the god i want. but it is the god i believe i
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have. i'm not going to get better. so i'm going to just wait to die, then. that's not an alternative, you know. i want to spend the remainder of my days living. whatever description that is. one of the things i always say, if you know someone who has lost a child or lost anybody who's important to them, and you're afraid to mention them because you think you might make them sad by reminding them that they died, they didn't forget they died. you're not reminding them. what you're reminding them of is that you remember that they lived. and that's a great, great gift. >> this is cool stuff, mom. >> i do know that when they're older and telling their own children about their grandmother, they'll be able to say she stood in the storm and when the wind did not blow her way, and it surely has not, she adjusted her sails. >> a very passing to say the
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least. at the time of her death we're hearing she was surrounded by family members, including john edwards, and of course the kids, young kids still. the youngest is 10. >> a mother and living life to the very end here. never in any pain, never unconscious. elizabeth edwards died at 61. mom, have you seen my green shirt?
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side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a $0 co-pay at lunesta.com. sleep well, on the wings of lunesta. "world news now" delivers your "morning papers." >> i'm guessing pretty much everyone has never heard the name keith situ. after you hear this story it's pretty unbelievable and i'm sure it's a story everyone's going to be talking about throughout the course of the day. this guy was added to the jets as an undrafted free agent in 2009. then he signed off the practice squad before they went to the playoffs. he gets a phone call from the jets who say, we need you as a defensive back. the guy turns it down. the rationale hint why he turns it down is unbelievable. this was his dream but he works for the norfolk southern
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railroad and he says, i've had this job and it's steady since you guys released me and i need to keep it because i have a family who's dependent on me, i have parents who are disabled. and really recognizing the short sightedness of an nfl career i have to have a steady source of income. he basically said, even though it's my dream to play, i think that right now it's not the time for me. >> so he needs something consistent, as opposed to the nfl career which can end on a dime. >> he says i'd rather stay with a secure company and job, somewhere i know i could have long-term employment, because i have so many people depending on me. >> very few people would make that move. a lot of props to that guy. in light of the elizabeth edwards news today, with her passing, this is an inspiring story. same kind of a situation here, different kind of ending. this is lester wollers, 86-year-old man in allentown, pennsylvania. again, 86. is out of the hospital because he's dealing with late-stage cancer. not a good prognosis here. been a life-long hunter and
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didn't want to miss the state's two-week deer season. has physical therapy, gets good enough to get out for the start of the season. he puts dad on a recliner, puts him on the side of the mountain where the family has a small hut, dad, you're going to be here, you're going to do this again. it was 19 degrees on opening day. out comes a buck, the biggested family had ever seen. he takes a shot. he follows him 80 to 90 yards then takes another aim, pulled the trigger, a perfect shot. he lowered the gun, said to his son "never give up." 86 years old. regardless what you think about hunting, this guy, whatever time he has left, is living how he wants to live. >> if you're looking for the next "it" gift, apparently given how obsessed we all are with ourselves we want gifts that are focused on us. someone went to a website called
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dna11.com, took a swab of his cheek cells and mailed the sample to the company. he now has a futuristic picture >> for information on services for oldeadults, the eldercare locator can help! >> i havlived in my house for 40 years and want to stay in my community. having someone help me with transportation makes that possible. >> the eldercare locator can put you in touch with loc resources to help older persons find home and mmunity based services. call 1.800.677.1116 or visit eldercare.gov today! the eldercare locator is a free public service of the u.s. administration on aging.
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leak plugged? the man behind the release of thousands of classified government documents is now behind bars. what happens to wikileaks now? then, sad good-bye. elizabeth edwards, passing away, but she leaves behind words of hope for so many. >> we're going to always look for the silver lining. it is who we are as people. and, cooking caution. what you need to know about some dishes in your kitchen that could explode. when you're baking this holiday season. it's wednesday, december 8th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now."
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>> yet another reason why i only order out. >> not a baker. >> not a baker. >> add that to your list if you need another excuse. >> that's right. good morning, everybody, i'm rob nelson. >> i'm vinita nair. it is business as usual this morning for wikileaks. less than a day after the arrest of founder julian assange the website is spilling a batch of new secret cables. u.s. officials insist the publication is threatening security, as well as foreign relations. >> assange is striking back. he vowed that wikileaks will continue to "fearlessly expose information." jim sciutto was in a london court when assange turned himself in. >> reporter: not seen in public in 31 days, julian assange was forced to break his cover to face a judge. >> he's fine. >> reporter: inside the courtroom, we watched him enter, smiling, and then listen calmly as he heard accusations of rape, sexual molestation, and coercion. based on consensual sexual encounters with two women, which
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they say turned nonconsensual. the first woman, identified as miss "a," said on august 14th he forcibly parted her legs, preventing her from moving, then had intercourse without a condom despite her protests. four days later, he allegedly coerced her again. a second woman, miss "w," said on august 17th, he had unprotected sex with her while she was sleeping. assange denies the accusations. the hearing then turned to the question of bail, saying the case is about sex, not wikile s wikileaks, the judge concluded assange had the means and cause to flee, ordering him to prison and back in court december 14th. he and his lawyers were confident that the judge would grant bail. they even offered conditions, including his wearing an electronic tag. in the end, the judge was not convinced. as an armored wagon carried assange to prison, supporters shouted "we love you." >> we love you! >> reporter: others carrying signs calling the case politically motivated.
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it's a charge his accusers' lawyer in sweden called nonsense. >> julian assange knows that what has happened in stockholm and in the other city with my two clients has nothing whatsoever to do with the wikileaks or cia. >> reporter: though their founder and leader is behind bars, a wikileaks source e-mailed abc news to say, tonight's stories and cables are already published. wikileaks continues to operate normally. scotland yard confirms assange refused to provide dna and fingerprints to british police. his lawyers say they're going to fight this. they will appeal the bail decision and fight extradition to sweden. jim sciutto, abc news, scotland yard. back here at home, we turn now to the passing of elizabeth edwards who has lost her battle with breast cancer. edwards died from liver failure at her north carolina home yesterday with her family at her side. >> it was a surprisingly quick end. doctors told her just last week she could live up to two months. friends say she was never in any pain and remained conscious until the end.
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president and mrs. obama are among those sending messages of condell lens to the family. funeral services are expected friday or saturday. elizabeth edwards was 61 years old. we will have more on her life and her legacy coming up later in this half hour. a closed-door meeting at the white house last night did nothing to soothe the democrats who are still furious over president obama's tax cut compromise. >> they are so annoyed that the deal could now be in jeopardy. john hendren is joining from us washington with details. good morning, john. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. the president is playing defense on home turf among democrats. in a hastily scheduled news conference at the white house, the president said, because of the deal he struck with republicans, middle-class americans will not go without their tax cuts. >> this country was founded on compromise. i couldn't go through the front door at this country's founding. to my democratic friends, what i suggest is, let's make sure that we understand this is a long game. this is not a short game.
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>> reporter: the price? giving republicans what they wanted. extending a tax cut for the wealthy as well, when president obama wanted to end, and one democrats say he should have fought harder against. >> it's something that's not done yet, let's make that clear. so i'm not a big fan of what has been negotiated. >> reporter: the president put it in the starkest possible terms, saying republicans essentially put a gun to the heads of middle-class americans. comparing the ordeal to hostage-taking. >> i think it's tempting not to negotiate with hostage-takers. unless the hostage gets harmed. >> reporter: as the news conference wore on, a visibly frustrated president grew increasingly impassioned and even feisty. he hasn't fully gotten his message across on capitol hill, apparently. asked if enough democrats could be rounded up in the senate to approve the deal, the senate's top democrat said "not yet." vice president joe biden was sent to capitol hill to rally the votes of reluctant democrats. the democratic leaders say there
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is not yet any consensus to pass the president's plan. rob and vinita? we may soon have a new weapon in the battle of the bulge. an fda panel has now approved a new weight loss drug, despite lingering concerns over its safety. contrave is a combination of two drugs that have been around since the '80s. panel members strongly recommended further testing of the medication's effect on the heart. the fda is expected to make a final decision on the drug by early next year. survivors of pearl harbor gathered in hawaii to mark the 69th anniversary of the world war ii attack. fighter jets flew over the ceremony in a missing man formation to honor the 2,400 service members who died. the 120 veterans who were told their sacrifices will be remembered for generations to come. the weather outside is still pretty frightful for two-thirds of the country, from the midwest to the deep south. citrus growers in florida have escaped major damage so far but they're in for another very cold morning today, and even more snow is coming down around the
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great lakes. one town getting a record 4 feet. barbara pinto braved the roads in pennsylvania. >> reporter: we've been on the road all day here in western pennsylvania, where the roads are slippery and in some cases barely visible. the region has been pounded with snow for days now, causing treacherous whiteout conditions, spinouts and pileups on the highway. travel misery. to the west in chicago, it's bitter cold. below zero with the windchill. from cleveland and buffalo, it's blinding snow. almost 3 feet of it in erie, pennsylvania. 40 inches in randolph, new york. falling so fast, plow drivers working round the clock can barely keep up. >> you get drifts. >> reporter: even in this part of the country where they're used to digging out from 100 inches of snow every winter, all of this is a rough start. barbara pinto, abc news. >> don't know how those folks do
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it. here's your wednesday weather around the country. another 6 to 10 inches of snow around the great lakes before it finally winds down later today. showers around new orleans. and a rain-snowy mix in shreveport and jackson, mississippi. rain from seattle to san francisco. snow in the cascades, sierras, and northern rockies. >> 43 in boise. 59 in sacramento. 73 in phoenix. a bone-chilling 10 degrees in fargo. 12 in the twin cities. 30s for much of the east coast. 54 degrees in new orleans. yes, virginia, there is a santa claus. but he better watch his mouth. >> that story of the day, a macy's in san francisco gave a long-time santa the boot after a couple complained that he told them a risque joke. here's the joke. john toomey acknowledged making a crack about being so happy and jolly because he knows where all the naughty boys and girls live. he says he has used this joke on adult visitors for years. >> santa wasn't out of work for long. he was hired by a local restaurant for a toy drive through christmas eve.
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he gets double his macy's salary and all he can eat and the freedom to tell any joke he wants. >> he actually was at macy's for 20 years. this is a guy who had been with macy's for a long time. he says after all, this not just phone calls from where he's been hired, phone calls from everywhere, including a lot from new york, people wanting to meet that santa. >> and a reality show featuring him, stay tuned for that, you know it's coming. more "world news now" coming up. hó
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we return now to the passing of elizabeth edwards. in a statement last night, president obama recalled her fortitude and grace, saying it will remain a source of inspiration. >> our cynthia mcfadden spoke with elizabeth edwards in the middle of her long battle with breast cancer. >> it's not a question of just surviving or dying. there's an in between too. there's living with cancer. and both those of us living wit
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cancer want full lives. >> reporter: in the months that followed elizabeth edwards achieved an almost iconic status for her stoic grace, up against a brutal schedule. huge boon to her husband's political hopes. she met her famously handsome and charismatic husband john when they were both law students at the university of north carolina. while he went on to become a renowned trial attorney, she built a successful law career in her own right. they had two children. daughter kate and son wade. but then, in 1996, their boy died in a freak car accident. wade was just 16. >> we made a decision when wade died about how we wanted to spend the rest of our lives. when we made that decision, it was facing our mortality. people think, no, you're facing your mortality, how could you make this choice? we say, we didn't make this choice in 2007, we made this choice in 1997. >> reporter: kate edwards, now 28, joined us for our interview.
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>> i want to read you something from your mother's book and get your reaction about your role in the family. she writes, kate busied herself with making our lives easier. caring for john and me. could she bring us dinner? did we want to play a game? want to walk down to the creek? how many times, then and now, i have thought of the line from isiah, and the little child shall lead them. we were led by kate. reminded of joy by kate. and blessed with kate. >> well, i mean, i think -- that's entirely too generous. but -- >> see what i mean? >> reporter: spurred on by their son's tragic death, john edwards ran for the senate. and in the meteoric rise by 2004 was chosen as john kerry's running mate for president. by now they had two young children. clair and jack. >> we didn't start fighting for you when this campaign began and
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we won't stop fighting for you when this campaign ends. >> reporter: the day they lost they learned elizabeth had breast cancer. >> the first thing i thought about was our children. a 6-year-old. i don't see him graduate from high school. >> reporter: she didn't make it ten years, she made it only four. the younger children, now 12 and 10. just a few months after we sat down with her, rumors of john edwards' infidelity were simmering. and would eventually boil over into a scandal the likes of which hasn't been seen in years. pictures surface of edwards holding a child believed to be his daughter with a former campaign staffer. in 2008, john edwards sat down with my colleague bob woodruff for "nightline." >> let me ask you the question. did you have an affair with miss hunter? >> in 2006, two years ago, i made a very serious mistake. a mistake that i am responsible for and no one else. >> how could you have done this? >> first of all, it happened
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during a period after she was in remission from cancer. that's no excuse in any possible light for what happened. >> reporter: in the end, elizabeth edwards would not let the dark days of her marriage define her. she wrote another book fittingly called "resilience" and became a passionate advocate for cancer survivors. she died at home at age 61, surrounded by her friends, her children, and even john. still her husband. but it is kate, once the little child who led her mother out of grief, who must now be there to lead her family forward. what would you want to see her do? >> all i care about her being is happy. if something happens to me, honestly, if something happens to john and to me, under our will she has two kids. it actually gives me great confidence as i go through this, to know that standing behind john and behind me and clair and
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jack is this splendid woman. >> we shouldn't forget in all this she was a mother. you have to feel for those two young kids. the news kind of came out late yesterday because they didn't want to put anything out to the press until the kids got home from school. >> elizabeth edwards, you can see there, passed away at the age of 61. coming up, something to watch for while you are doing your holiday baking. >> the dangers of exploding, yeah, exploding cookware. that's coming up next on "world news now."
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vinita, i know you're busy baking up a storm these days. she actually makes a pretty good banana bread. you should be careful. >> yeah, rob doesn't want me to join the thousands of people who have been injured by exploding glass bakeware over the last decade. it's the regular glassware we're all using.
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elisabeth leamy has the details. >> reporter: the complainted started on the internet. >> the pyrex bowl exploded. >> reporter: including youtube videos like these. >> it wasn't hot, it wasn't coldness, it was just sitting here and exploded into a million pieces. >> reporter: "consumer reports" says its tests show hot, glass bakeware can shatter unexpectedly. both major glass bakeware manufacturers -- pyrex and anchor -- say decades ago they switched to a different type of glass that's more environmentally friendly to produce. >> they're using something called sodalime which is less expensive. >> reporter: to compare the two researchers put european bakeware, still made of the old type of glass, in a 400-degree oven then set it on a damp counter to cool. nothing happened. when they did the same experiment with u.s. bakeware, made from the new type of glass, watch.
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both companies said that americans use glass bakeware billions of times a year and report problems only a minute fraction, less than 1%, of the time. world kitchen, maker of pyrex, said consumers are far more likely to be injured by dropping glass bakeware and the newer glass is more resister tent to impact breakage. anchor hawking said the vast majority of injuries result from failure to use the product according to instructions. part of the challenge is that the list of warnings keeps growing. i count at least 16 different dos and don'ts here on the back of the package. things like, don't add liquid to an already hot pan. don't set it down on a wet surface. or a metal surface. do preheat the oven before inserting the glass bake ware. do coat the bottom of the bake ware with liquid before cooking something like vegetables or meat that can release liquid.
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in washington, elisabeth leamy, abc news. >> all right, so you paid attention, you won't be injuring anyone on the staff. >> i didn't know to put water on the bottom for vegetables. good to know. >> i just make jell-o. coming up, more on "world news now," stay with us. / around his house. these people chose freedom over restrictions. independence over limitations. they chose mobility. they chosehe scooter store. and this is the team of mobility experts who made it all happen. ii great news, you've been approved for payment. dr. cruz, i'm calling on behalf ofmarie stanford. and they can make it happen for you. hi, i'm doug harrison, if you're living with limited mobility, call the scooter store today. i promise, no other company will work harder to make you mobile or do more to ensure your total satisfaction. i expected they'd help me file some paperwork with medicare and my insurance.
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i never expected them to be so nice or work so hard to get me a power chair at no cost to me. if we qualify you and medicare denies your claim for a w scooter or power chair, i'll give it to you absolutely free. that's the scooter store guarantee. we'll wo with your insurance company, even help with financing. if there's a way, we'll find it. when they delivered mom's power chair, i expected they'd show her how to use it once or twice. that man stayed for hours! whatever it takes, as long as it takes. that's our guarantee. why do we go to < uch great lengths? because making you mobile is our mission. we'llwork wit your doctor. we'll work with medicare and lçur private insurance. we'll even service your scooter anywhere in the country. call the sco÷"er store today.
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sleep is here, on the wings of lunesta. and if you wake up often in the middle of the night... rest is here, on the wings of lunesta. lunesta helps you fall asleep and stay asleep, so you can wake up feeling rested. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions, such as tongue or throat swelling, occur rarely and may be fatal.
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side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a $0 co-pay at lunesta.com. sleep well, on the wings of lunesta. finally this half hour, it happened just a few blocks from our studios 30 years ago tonight. >> that's when former beatle john lennon was shot and killed outside of his apartment building. >> tom brokaw of the bbc covered the story then. three decades later, he does the same now.
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>> john lennon first went to new york as a member of the beatles in 1964. beatle mania was has its height. ♪ she's happy as can be you know ♪ >> reporter: mentioning shortly before he died he walked in central park, commenting on the freedom he enjoyed in his adopted city. >> i just want to shake hands. it's coolest when that happens. i'm just known enough to keep me ego floating but unknown enough to get around, which is nice. >> reporter: his peace was about to be shattered. outside lennon's home at 10:50 p.m. new york time on december the 8th, 1988, mark david chapman fired five shots effectively snuffing out the former beatle's life. badly wounded, john lennon was taken to the nearby roosevelt hospital. >> i actually held his heart in my hand as the nurses rapidly transfused blood. i tried to massage the heart as we put blood into his body. we knew that there was no way that we could restore circulation. >> reporter: back in britain,
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the news of his death was broken on the bbc's "today" program. >> from outside the apartment building where the murder took place is our reporter tom broke. >> a very weird scene indeed because they're playing lennon music. a lot of them are in tears and they're weeping. and they're either stunned or they're hysterical. >> reporter: on this 30th anniversary, some of the biggest names in the music industry are paying tribute to lennon. >> i just know i wouldn't be standing without him. and my whole life as an artist was kind of shaped by him. >> reporter: john lennon probably wouldn't like all this retrospective praise. in one of his last major print interviews he said, i don't believe in yesterday, i'm only interested in what i'm doing now. while his past may not have interested him, clearly 30 years after he died both he and his music are still of great interest to many of us. tom brook, bbc news, new york. >> hard to believe it's been 30 years. actually the issue of "rolling
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stone" coming out this friday will feature excerpts from an interview from three days before he was murdered that a reporter just found 30 years later. >> they say the
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tough talk. >> this country was founded on compromise. >> the president explains to the country and his own party why he made the deal on tax cuts. then, remembering elizabeth edwards. a look back at her brave life and the many public battles she fought. and, if they build it, why one state is building its own noah's ark and why not everyone is on board with the idea. it's wednesday, december 8th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> that story we talked about on "morning papers" a few days ago now making national news. a heated debate going on in
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kentucky. >> interesting to see it could be funded by taxpayer money, which is probably not how most of us would like to spend our taxpayer money. >> always controversy. good morning, everybody, i'm rob nelson. >> i'm vinita nair. president obama is pushing back against members of his own party over the tax cut plan. top democrats have been harshly critical of the compromise. >> mr. obama is delivering a message aimed not just at democrats but independent voters as well. john hendren is joining us now from washington with the very latest. hi, john. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. remember when the president promised a different tone in washington? his own tone changed after he fielded criticism from democrats on the tax cut deal he cut with republicans. and he grew more forceful and feisty than ever. president obama came out swinging against republicans. >> on the republican side, this is their holy grail. these tax cuts for the wealthy. >> reporter: against democrats who say he caved by giving republicans that tax cut for those earning over $250,000. >> this country was founded on compromise.
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i couldn't go through the front door at this country's founding. to my democratic friends what i suggest is let's make sure we understand this is a long game, this is not a short game. >> reporter: and against republicans again. >> i felt that the middle-class tax cuts were being held hostage to the high-end tax cuts. i think it's tempting not to negotiate with hostage-takers. unless the hostage gets harmed. >> reporter: the president said he kept a campaign promise, preserving the bush tax cuts for middle-class americans. but critics within his own party say the price was too high. >> it's something that's not done yet, let's make that clear. so i'm not a big fan of what has been negotiated. >> reporter: vice president joe biden was on capitol hill working to rally reluctant democrats. and fielding friendly fire from members of his own party. the president's compromise might anger liberals but analysts say it appeals to the independents who want to see both parties working together. rob and vinita?
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in other political news this morning, new mexico governor bill richardson is going to north korea next week for some high-level meetings. richardson has made the trip before as a special u.s. troubleshooter. he was apparently invited this time by officials involved in the north korean nuclear program. the visit comes just three weeks after the north attacked a south korean island, killing four people. grace under fire. strength of spirit, her husband's biggest asset. those are just a few of the accolades pouring in this morning about elizabeth edwards who lost her long battle with breast cancer yesterday. ron claiborne has details. >> reporter: in her final days, elizabeth edwards was surrounded by family and friends in her chapel hill, north carolina, home. including john edwards, who she separated from earlier this year. her friends saying, he is still family. her family released a statement. today we have lost the comfort of elizabeth's presence but she remains the heart of this family. we love her and will never know
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anyone more inspiring or full of life." doctors had stopped treatment for her cancer that she had valiantly battled for six years. elizabeth edwards was the anchor of her husband's rising political star. mary elizabeth anania was the daughter of a navy pilot. she married john edwards, her law school sweetheart, in 1977 and the couple had four children. but their oldest, 16-year-old wade, was killed in a car accident in 1996. >> did that, you know -- did it seem like the world had crumbled underneath us? it did. >> reporter: she rose to national prominence when her husband was elected senator from north carolina, and later -- >> my love and your next vice president, john edwards. >> reporter: john kerry selected him as the vice presidential nominee in 2004, the same year edwards ran for president. it was on the day that john kerry conceded defeat -- november 3rd, 2004 -- that elizabeth edwards was diagnosed with breast cancer.
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>> it's thrown me off course. i'm kind of thinking this might be it. in bad times you still keep your eye on what it was that was important to you. and you press forward with that. >> reporter: four years later, another blow. just as her husband returned to the campaign trail for another run at the presidency -- >> the bottom line is her cancer is back. >> is this a hardship for us? yes. it's yet another hurdle. >> reporter: she would encourage her husband to continue his presidential run. which would soon be rocked by political scandal. the crushing admission by her husband of an affair. a child with another woman. in the face of all of that, she remained devoted to her family. elizabeth edwards, gracious and resilient to the very end. according to friends elizabeth edwards did not want her life to be summed up as having lost a battle to cancer, but celebrated for the life she led for 61 years. ron claiborne, abc news, chapel hill, north carolina. >> you know, you heard ron mention her son wade there in the story. it was interesting to hear her
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say there was something of solace for her in the sense that knowing when she finally does pass she'll finally be reunited with wade. she was such a strong figure. hearing that, something in me empathized with her and i think that was part of her power, everyone empathized with all the struggles she'd been through to some extent. >> she was a mom for sure. the kids were the love of her life for sure. actually what killed her yesterday, liver failure. family and friends who were by her side say she was never unconscious and never in any pain. elizabeth edwards dead today at the age of 61. we're learning about a near-hit between two passenger planes the night before thanksgiving. a jet blue flight from austin, texas action had just landed at boston's logan airport. it was supposed to go left but instead, it went right. dangerously close to another aircraft that was ready to take off. a veteran air traffic controller is now credited with keeping those two planes from colliding. well, as if parents aren't already nervous about their teenagers getting behind the wheel, an increasingly popular high-stakes game called fugitive
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is posing a whole new threat and putting their lives on the line. luke duecy of our station komo in seattle has the story. >> reporter: speeding down the road, skidding out of control, smack into a tree. the car is totaled and police tell me the 16-year-old driver and passenger were playing a popular and dangerous game called fugitive. >> i thought something had blown up. my husband knew instantly it was a car wreck. >> reporter: the wreck jolted kristin mccarthy right off her sofa. she says when she got to the scene she saw several teenagers upset and crying. >> i think they realized what a stupid game it was. obviously, it was too late after the car had crashed. >> reporter: more and more teenagers are chasing each other down streets and highways at extreme speeds. just look at this. the skidmarks start 25 yards up the road. this is where she hit the curb, skidding along the sidewalk and right into the grass. she hit this tree, plowed into that fence, and took it out. and look, there's shattered glass all over the place.
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her father tells me he had never heard about this game called fugitive until this accident, now he wants to get the word out to other parents. >> a lot of people talk about after they play it, i'm playing fugitive tonight, do you want to join? whatever. >> reporter: that's why police tell me they're cracking down before the stakes get even higher. >> our thanks to luke duecy. rarely seen photos from the kennedy white house are up for grabs for the right price. among the collection what's believed to be the only known photograph of both john kennedy and his brother talking with marilyn monroe. the snaps come from the collection of the first official white house photographer. and now with that here's a look at your wednesday weather. up to 10 inches of lake effect snow around buffalo, rochester, grand rapids, and south bend. showers along the gulf coast. rain in the pacific northwest and northern california. up to 1 foot of snow in the cascades. several inches in the sierras and northern rockies. >> 46 degrees in salt lake city. 52 in seattle. 60 in colorado springs. fargo and minneapolis don't even get into the teens.
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chicago hits 23. detroit 30. it's 32 degrees here in new york. 38 in atlanta. 66 in miami. it's been so chilly down in florida, even a fur coat wasn't enough to keep one resident warm. >> at the miami zoo, bonnie the orangutan couldn't get toasty in the sun so she cleverly decided to bundle up. bonnie took refuge under a big blanket. the cold air was apparently still unbearable so bonnie completely covered herself, which i think is an excellent idea, with the blanket from head to toe. >> what are you trying to say, vinita? >> i'm saying it's freezing in here and i'm tired of it. go bonnie, i'm on your team. >> we're coming right back, everybody, don't go far. let me tell you about a very important phone call i made.
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sleep is here, on the wings of lunesta. and if you wake up often in the middle of the night... rest is here, on the wings of lunesta. lunesta helps you fall asleep and stay asleep, so you can wake up feeling rested. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions, such as tongue or throat swelling, occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a $0 co-pay at lunesta.com. sleep well, on the wings of lunesta.
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wikileaks founder julian assange is in a british jail right now after a judge refused to let him out on bail. assange turned himself in tuesday in connection with a sex crimes investigation going on in sweden. >> nevertheless, his website is vowing to continue releasing more leaked u.s. documents. tom simons of the bbc has more from london. >> reporter: he had not been seen since coming to britain a month ago. now he was to break cover in front of the world's media. there was a brief glimpse of julian assange. freedom of information activist. before he disappeared into court to face sex charges. his lawyer, mark stevens, said assange offered himself up for arrest after a second european warrant was issued from sweden. calm in court, assange was told two women have accused him of
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rape and sexual coercion, in particular to have unprotected sex. then came the question of whether he should be given bail. during the hearing, a charity worker, ken loach, the filmmaker, and john pilcher, the journalist, offered to pay thousands of pounds. should julian assange abscond. the judge refused bail. he says the evidence in this case wasn't clear but the charges were serious and there was a substantial risk he could disappear. their offers of what lawyers call surety of bail rejected, assange's supporters turned to the media. >> i'm here because i believe this is about the principle of the universal right of freedom of information. and our right to be told the truth. >> reporter: the judge said this case was about sex, not wikileaks. but john pilcher is suspicious. >> the swedish case is chaotic.
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the senior swedish prosecutor dismissed it. and it was only brought back after the intervention of the senior right-wing swedish political figure. >> reporter: assange's team are worried his connection with wikileaks could result in him being extradited from sweden to the u.s. nonsense, says the lawyer for the two women who made the accusations. >> julian assange knows what has happened in stockholm and the other city with my two clients has nothing whatsoever to do with the wikileaks or cia or united states, anything like that. he knows that. and i regret and i'm critical against him that he has not declared that openly. >> reporter: the extradition procedure will take weeks and it will take place as confidential information continues to flow from the world's most controversial website. tom simons, bbc, westminster magistrate's court. >> people are wondering what the practical impact is of the release of these documents.
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sources are already saying that countries around the world are changing the way they share information with america because of these leaks. so there is a real everyday impact of these thousands and thousands of documents now out there for the world to see, thanks to this guy. >> it's also interesting to see how it played out in the sense we haven't seen or heard anything from this guy for about 30 days until he turns himself in and all these documents continue to come out throughout all of it. >> an ongoing story as we say in our business. when we come back it is time for the wednesday "skinny." >> one reality star is weighing in on the controversial airport security checks, causing quite an uproar. that and more when we come right back.
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welcome back, everybody. many of you out there like me follow the ever-entertaining kardashian clan out there. you pretty much know khloe tends to be the outspoken one. she doesn't hold back, she'll tell you straight up what she thinks. she made an appearance on george lopez's talk show and she was asked about all these -- another controversial issue, all these new security procedures by the
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tsa, pat-downs and so forth, at airports across the country. this is what khloe said and it's getting her in a little bit of hot water. >> how is it now with the tsa? >> they basically are just raping you in public. i was asked the other day, do you want to go for a screening or get patted down? i'm like i'll get patted down. the people are so aggressive. it's like, chill out. you didn't find anything on me yet, calm down. >> as you can imagine it's the comparison to rape that is kind of working up, riling up some folks. they quoted an official at the santa barbara rape crisis center saying, i think it was an ill-informed thing for her to say. rape is defined as forceful penetration. a lot of young women look up to celebrities like the kardashians. we are all about educating people about rape in our center. by using the word in this context it blurs the issue as to what it actually constitutes. some people didn't like such a drastic, strong comparison.
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we'll see if there's more fallout from that. >> lisa lang was back on the set of "the view." how long has it been since we've seen her on the set of "the view"? >> awhile. >> she taped the show on tuesday that's going to air on friday and she really spoke candidly about her miscarriage. apparently she was nine weeks into her pregnancy. this was about six months ago. she says the doctors told her at that point the baby did not have a heartbeat. she says, i felt like "a complete failure." she says her biggest fear now is basically getting pregnant again and having this happen again. she said she knows losing another baby would leave her absolutely devastated. the reason she's coming forward is she says that as a woman, she feels like other women don't share their stories. other women walk around with this false notion that you want to get pregnant, you snap your fingers and there you are. to that end she's also created a website, the secret society of women, and her hope is women will logon and anonymously share their experiences so women like her, who are going through this process, can lean on each other. so really -- >> an outlet to go to. it has to be an incredibly painful experience. she says she felt like a
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failure, that's so intense that she shared that. wow. hopefully people take advantage of that website, they're in that situation. take a look at this picture from angelina jolie. this is her young daughter, 4-year-old shiloh jolie pitt. well, you'll kind of notice shiloh here isn't exactly the most feminine-looking little girl. so they asked angelina about this in the daily magazine "you" magazine. jolie says very candidly, she likes to dress like a boy and wants her hair cut like a boy and she wanted to be called john for a while. some kids wear capes and want to be superman, she wants to be like her brothers, it's who she is. she says basically that they're not trying to curtail her fashion sense or who she wants to be, she says at the same time we're hopefully encouraging their individuality as they get to know who they are and not getting in the way of that. that's why they are six very strong individuals, she says of her clan of kids. she's not stepping in the way of young shiloh's self-expression. some people saying, what's with the whole john thing and want dressed and hair cut
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like a little boy? never dull in that household. >> she may look like a boy but it's in designer duds, end of the day all that matters. good for them, express yourself, do what you want to do. around his house. these people chose freedom over restrictions. independence over limitations. they chose mobility. they chosehe scooter store. and this is the team of mobility experts who made it all happen. ii great news, you've been approved for payment. dr. cruz, i'm calling on behalf ofmarie stanford. and they can make it happen for you. hi, i'm doug harrison, if you're living with limited mobility, call the scooter store today. i promise, no other company will work harder to make you mobile or do more to ensure your total satisfaction. i expected they'd help me file some paperwork with medicare and my insurance.
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i never expected them to be so nice or work so hard to get me a power chair at no cost to me. if we qualify you and medicare denies your claim for a w scooter or power chair, i'll give it to you absolutely free. that's the scooter store guarantee. we'll wo with your insurance company, even help with financing. if there's a way, we'll find it. when they delivered mom's power chair, i expected they'd show her how to use it once or twice. that man stayed for hours! whatever it takes, as long as it takes. that's our guarantee. why do we go to < uch great lengths? because making you mobile is our mission. we'llwork wit your doctor. we'll work with medicare and lçur private insurance. we'll even service your scooter anywhere in the country. call the sco÷"er store today.
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i probably have one of these in every room. they last so long! nice! you can even hear it crackle. [ candle crackle ] [ male announcer ] also from the home collection febreze no-spill wood diffuser. smells amazing! it's been weeks and we're still enjoying it.
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the scented oil travels up through the wooden block and out into the air. and no spills. [ male announcer ] the febreze home collection. featuring soy blend candles, wood diffusers and flameless luminaries. here some are stories to watch today on abc news. admiral mike mullen meets with his south korean counterpart today in seoul. it's the first in a series of meetings with the south since they were attacked three weeks ago by north korea. both chambers of congress are expected to vote today on the dream act. if passed it would give legal status to young illegal immigrants who join the military or attend college. fans around the world will be remembering beatles legend john lennon, who was killed 30 years ago today here in new york city. >> not far from our studio either. >> six blocks i think they said, yeah. we have an update on a story we brought you earlier this week. the state of kentucky wants to build a noah's ark, complete
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with animals. >> they're not worried about saving their citizens from floods but saving them from the bad economy. the big question this morning, if they build it will the tourists come? >> linsey davis has more. >> reporter: hollywood imagined noah's ark like this. but if developers in kentucky can float their newest idea, this will be the site of a real-life replica. >> we'll be using about, oh, 160 acres to build the ark encounter. >> reporter: they're building it on a, well, biblical scale. using dimensions from genesis. 450 feet long. about 600 train cars can fit inside. the deck, longer than 35 tennis courts. taller than a three-story building. there will be a tower of babel and live animals too. a $150 million lifeboat expected to create 900 jobs and attract 1.6 million visitors a year.
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$250 million in state revenue. the ark that's planned to be built on this 800-acre site has opened up the floodgates of controversy. critics say it's a direct violation of separation between church and state. that's because kentucky's governor promised the developers almost $40 million in tax breaks to build there. >> people of kentucky didn't elect me governor to debate religion, they elected me governor to create jobs. >> reporter: but not everyone's on board. >> the government shouldn't be using its money to advance religion. that's what's unconstitutional about this. >> reporter: this combination -- half theme park, half sunday school -- has been done before. >> if you read your bible, then you're learning what god says to do. >> reporter: but not with state funding. the creation museum is 40 miles away from the ark. in just a few years it's had more than 1 million visitors. as for this old ark, it has a new mission. to help weather an economic storm.
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linsey davis, abc news, grant county, kentucky. that is the news for this half hour. you can always follow us on our
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